Categories
Mobilities Rocky Mountain West Slow Food

REAP

The Environmental Unsustainability of the American Food Machine

Oil refinery in Commerce City, painting by Lee Lee
Oil refinery in Commerce City, Colorado | oil on canvas

What does it look like to have a tree scream out in desperation? This body of work is driven by concerns about our nourishment, as well as a fear for the resulting degradation of the environment.

Oil makes up the foundation of the American food machine. Our reliance on fossil fuels in food production is immense. Not only are they used extensively in farming and transportation, they are also the catalyst which fixes ammonium nitrate to make chemical fertilizers. Dominating this installation are paintings depicting an oil refinery in the rain. The size emphasizes our reliance on oil, while the execution questions the effects of fossil fuels on the cleanliness of our natural resources through paint stains dripping into the water.

Oil painting of midwestern crop circles by Lee LEe
Crop Circles | oil on canvas

Flying above Midwestern plains, the crop circles and grids of industrial farms are an imposition on ancient grasslands. The only remaining natural elements are the occasional rivers whose fingers branch up into the geometric landscape. The Crop series consists of dormant fields under a light dusting of snow to reflect how our process of conventional farming is leaching nutrients from the earth while filling our waterways with poisons, which will ultimately cause infertility in our land. Pairing the Crop landscapes with interiors of an abandoned Intercontinental Ballistic Missile silo illustrates a direct link between our systematic food production and war. After WWII, the US Agriculture department encouraged farmers to spread ammonium nitrate, leftover from bomb construction, onto their fields as fertilizer. Today we are deeply entrenched in a war in an attempt to feed our oil habit, which in turn sustains the industrial food machine. It is disturbing that our “nourishment” is born out of war and continues to manifest such destruction to this day.

Abandoned slaughterhouse, watercolor painting by Lee Lee
Abandoned slaughterhouse | watercolor, pencil & tar on shotgunned paper collage

Continuing down the path of food production, a series of watercolors manifests the haunted spaces of an abandoned slaughterhouse. The energy it takes to raise meat takes up the bulk of grain that we produce. In his book, Anger, Thich Nhat Hanh describes how traces of energy are absorbed through consumption. For example, if an animal leads a miserable life, then we absorb that misery when we take their meat into our bodies. This series is complimented by a set of roadkill drawings which serve as a poignant reflection of our attitude towards animal life; these wild animals lay as part of our refuse, disregarded as we speed along the highways of our own lives.

'bleeding' aspen photograph by Lee Lee
Unaltered photograph
‘bleeding’ Aspen
Lazy Shamrock Ranch, Colorado

Both nitrate and carbon emissions from America’s conventional food machine make a huge contribution to climate change. One of the most visually striking symptoms is emerging as a new virus found in aspen trees. The red gashes in the thin skin-like bark of the trees appear as flesh wounds. More than a literal illustration of a shifting environment, the corporeal appearance of the trees make a connection to our own bodies. As our health is intricately connected to the health of the environment, the violence conveyed through the process of using a shotgun in this series reflects the violence we are wreaking on ourselves.

Pinting of a Titan missile silo by Lee Lee
Titan Missile Silo Eastern Colorado Acryllic on Canvas

The built structures portrayed here are in various states of decay; a return to nature. This represents the beginning of a shift in attitude of many Americans who are concerned about the adverse effects of the way we produce and consume food. Despite the prevailing theme of environmental demise in this body of work, we can hardly destroy the environment. Ultimately the world will survive; the question is whether or not humans will be around to enjoy it. The survival of humanity will be determined by the attitudes and approaches we take towards interacting with the environment now.

Categories
Americas Rocky Mountain West Slow Food

a year in grandpa’s garden – Taos

Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Radish - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Apple - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Waterfall - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Zucchini - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Calabash - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Calabash - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
tomato - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Yellow Squash - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Corn - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
3 sisters - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
cauliflower - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
broccoli - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
carrot - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
beets - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
kale - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
kale - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
winter squash - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Categories
Asia Slow Food Women

Intha Market

Inle Lake, Burma

These watermedia works on paper were created in Taos in the first year or so of Thatcher Gray’s life. They depict a meandering through the Intha market on Inle lake in Burma I took a decade earlier, when the country was considered to be on the cusp of genocide. Dominating the atmosphere is the official verbiage of Myanmar’s Military government, oppressing the space with the dingy palette of the newspaper. By 2010, I was hearing news of flat out genocidal acts being performed around the perimeter of the country by friends who were volunteering there as health workers. Their stories inspired me to reflect on the tensions felt by those who come from communities targeted; how it must feel to navigate this brutal society while maintaining an identity interwoven with traditional tribal practices. The expressions portrayed in the Intha Market series often seem tense, but as is the nature of markets, cultures may thrive in the face of oppression through the exchange and practice of culinary traditions. The ‘ghost’ paintings invoke a certain amount of freedom for me, and I consider them to be as important to the work as a whole, together with the sides I actively produced. The lack of newspaper and colors that drift unconfined by additional lines through the handmade paper acquired in the market. Some drawings contain the first scribblings of Thatcher Gray, who was just starting to learn how to hold markers in ways that he could imitate mom.

Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Lee Lee | Intha Market, Inle Lake, Burma 2005
Mixed Media including watercolor, sharpie, pencil, ballpoint pen and gouache on local handmade paper, collaged with Myanmar’s official newspaper
roughly 11″ x 11″ | 2010 Taos
Categories
.debris. Americas Industry Mobilities Rocky Mountain West

crop

Flying over eastern Colorado in the late winter, fields that had been dusted with snow offered a poignant landscape which I photographed out of my airplane window. For me the palette evoked a sparse, infertile landscape. It made me think of reports of industrial agriculture impacting the land by causing topsoil runoff and nutrient depletion. The huge layer of loam found through the Midwest has allowed for rich cultivation for generations of farmers. It cushions the blow of chemical intense industrial practices, even as the soil is steadily eroded. When we look to areas that have been farmed for millennia, we find that this approach cannot be replicated because the delicate balance of soil building through traditional means is taken away. As demonstrated by the thousands of farmer suicides through India because of their ‘green’ revolution, the impacts of switching to an industrial approach can be devastating. As farmers there return to crop rotation and soil building, we can think about the direction we are heading and how to alleviate the potential demise of what had been one of the richest cultivation grounds. The photographs were not great quality, but they offered enough visual information to create a set of three landscapes painted with acrylic. It fits into the bigger series on industrial food production I explored in tandem with growing our own garden with a very young Thatcher Gray.

painting of crop circles by Lee Lee
painting of crop circles by Lee Lee
painting of crop circles by Lee Lee
Categories
Rocky Mountain West

brand

Cattle branding - pencil drawing by Lee Lee
Preparing the tag | pencil on cardstock | 4.25″ x 5.25″
Cattle branding - pencil drawing by Lee Lee
Nostril pinch | pencil on cardstock | 4.25″ x 5.25″
In the collection of the McFaddin Ranch, Texas
Cattle branding - pencil drawing by Lee Lee
Roped | pencil on cardstock | 4.25″ x 5.25″
In the collection of the McFaddin Ranch, Texas
Cattle branding - pencil drawing by Lee Lee
Taggin’ | pencil on cardstock | 4.25″ x 5.25″
Cattle branding - pencil drawing by Lee Lee
Dogged | pencil on cardstock | 4.25″ x 5.25″
In the collection of the McFaddin Ranch, Texas
Cattle branding - pencil drawing by Lee Lee
Castration | pencil on cardstock | 4.25″ x 5.25″
In the collection of the McFaddin Ranch, Texas
Categories
Rocky Mountain West

Lazy Shamrock Ranch

Bulldoggin', oil painting by Lee Lee
Bulldoggin’ | oil on canvas | 54″ x 64″
On view at The Distillery, Taos
Bulldoggin' detail by Lee Lee
detail of Bulldoggin’
Branding & doctoring | oil on canvas | 22″ x 32″
In the collection of Kelly Snider
Oil painting of cowboys be Lee Lee
Brand | oil on canvas | 32″ x 44″
In the Townsend collection, Denver
Corral | oil on canvas | 22″x32″
In the collection of Gyda & Sean Flanigan
Sean with the iron | oil on canvas | 54″ x 64″
On view at the SEED Barn, Blue Hill
detail of Sean with the Iron
Categories
Americas Slow Food

Kalihi

Time spent in Honolulu in the first years of the new millennium was split between our home, way up in the top of the valley above Palolo, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, where I studied stone lithography with James Koga, and the studio, perched above a woodshop that built Ukeleles in the industrial zone of Kalihi. This was an area where I needed to be accompanied by a local as it was rare to see a white face there. It was in Kalihi that I found and painted these fish markets. The street scenes reflected in shop windows were painted in Chinatown, from photographs I had taken on family dim sum Sundays.

Fish market in Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
Crab tanks | Private collection, Mexico
Fish market in Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
On view at the Taos Distillery
Fish market in Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
Red Snapper | Private collection, Providence RI
Chinatown Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
Chinatown Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
Chinatown Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee