Categories
Americas Mobilities Slow Food Women

Chichicastenango

With eleven month old Thatcher Gray on my back, we meander our way though Chichicastenango’s Saturday market, awash in vibrant Mayan color and patterning. Starting with stone lithograph prints of rain forest inspired drawings, tracked with fresh tar then torn into squares, the process represents the fragmentation of Mayan land and culture. Atop this foundation, cultural persistence is demonstrated by Mayan traditional practices maintained despite Guatemala’s history of atrocity.

Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Lee Lee | Chichicastenango Market, Guatemala 2009
Mixed media including tar, sharpie, colored pencil, watercolor and gouache on torn stone lithograph
14″ x 14″ | 2010 Taos
Categories
Asia Slow Food Women

Intha Market

Inle Lake, Burma

These watermedia works on paper were created in Taos in the first year or so of Thatcher Gray’s life. They depict a meandering through the Intha market on Inle lake in Burma I took a decade earlier, when the country was considered to be on the cusp of genocide. Dominating the atmosphere is the official verbiage of Myanmar’s Military government, oppressing the space with the dingy palette of the newspaper. By 2010, I was hearing news of flat out genocidal acts being performed around the perimeter of the country by friends who were volunteering there as health workers. Their stories inspired me to reflect on the tensions felt by those who come from communities targeted; how it must feel to navigate this brutal society while maintaining an identity interwoven with traditional tribal practices. The expressions portrayed in the Intha Market series often seem tense, but as is the nature of markets, cultures may thrive in the face of oppression through the exchange and practice of culinary traditions. The ‘ghost’ paintings invoke a certain amount of freedom for me, and I consider them to be as important to the work as a whole, together with the sides I actively produced. The lack of newspaper and colors that drift unconfined by additional lines through the handmade paper acquired in the market. Some drawings contain the first scribblings of Thatcher Gray, who was just starting to learn how to hold markers in ways that he could imitate mom.

Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Intha Market, Burma watercolor by Lee Lee
Lee Lee | Intha Market, Inle Lake, Burma 2005
Mixed Media including watercolor, sharpie, pencil, ballpoint pen and gouache on local handmade paper, collaged with Myanmar’s official newspaper
roughly 11″ x 11″ | 2010 Taos
Categories
Americas Women

Vrnda

Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee

When I was pregnant, I had the opportunity to listen to one of the impassioned speeches given by Vrnda Noel in Denver. Mother of a combat medic in Iraq, she shared deeply emotive stories of what was happening there based on letters written home by her son. She had made him promise to write about his experiences in minute detail. Ultimately this ended up being cathartic for him as there were many traumatic situations that he was able to let go, and then forget. The speech she was giving was during an anti-war rally outside our local senators’ offices and I was struck by the expressions of love, sorrow and fear that passed through her delicate features. After his return to the US, they created a number of participatory creative projects that spoke to the impacts of war and the process of healing the mental wounds from it. Empty army boots and civilian shoes installed in Civic Center Park represented the growing death toll on both sides of the conflict. The combat paper project helped Vets transform by encouraging them to purge frustrations by destroying uniforms, then use the pulp to create artworks. Their practices inspired some aspects of the community work I’ve developed over the years since.

This series of portraits was included in the very first exhibition I had after Thatcher Gray was born. I created them while he was in my womb, and the process allowed me to consider this relationship between a mother and her war torn son. Shreds of oil paintings that I had torn apart with a shotgun were used as the base of a collage, which I then laid hot coals atop to produce a speckling of charred board across the picture plain. Pencil drawings depict the range of expressions that passed through Vrnda as she spoke with determination about her love for her son, and as an extension, all of the other sons affected by war.

Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee
Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee
Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee
Categories
Asia

Confined shrines

As my pregnant belly swelled through the second trimester, I resided at the Ragdale Foundation on an awarded residency to work on a series of mixed media works depicting the confined shrines I photographed in Myanmar 3 years prior. I was struck by how many Buddhist shrines were kept in cages under lock and key and felt the images were a poignant reflection of the political climate. Some of the works contain Burmese newspaper collaged in. They were created with a xerograph process which involves transferring xerox copies, in this case of high contrast photographs of the cages that surrounded the shrines. Atop the transfers, Embedded within the cages are the golden shrines, well tended aside from being caged.

mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
mixed media painting from Myanmar by Lee Lee
Categories
Asia Women

Bagan

Burma

In 2005, Burma was on the cusp on Genocide. The country was just opening up to tourism, but it took a lot of attention to travel in a way that did not directly support the oppressive government. We visited the ancient temples sprawled across the plains in Bagan and were left in awe of the structures. This series of portraits are of women found on the streets, in between temples and tucked inside shrine rooms. They are shy in an environment steeped in fear.

Painting of Bagan, Burma by Lee Lee
Painting of Bagan, Burma by Lee Lee
Painting of Bagan, Burma by Lee Lee
Painting of Bagan, Burma by Lee Lee
Lee Lee | Women of Bagan | Burma 2005
Mixed media, including oil, pencil. oil pastel and pen on paper
12″ x 15″ | 2006 | In the collection of Kate Culligan & Josh Comfort, Denver
Categories
Asia

Rajavihara

Ta Prohm temple
Angkor Wat, Cambodia

The Buddhist temple dedicated to the mother of Jayavarman VII stands supported by tree roots that have cascaded down the stone structures and embedded themselves so intricately with the temple, it would prove very difficult to remove them without destroying the ancient buildings. In a beautiful marriage of nature and architecture, the forms were born of many years of the temple sitting forgotten in the tropical forest. Throughout the complex, buildings are adorned with extensive friezes of the battle between the Khmer & Cham centuries ago. In more recent history, it was a stronghold of the Khmer Rouge until they were ousted by the Vietnamese after the American War there. Evidence of bullet holes are pockmarks scattered across the surfaces as residual marks from this tumultuous era. This series was painted from photographs I took there in 1999. At that time, I was exploring the long term impacts of the American presence through the region. My father was a captain in Intelligence during the American war in Vietnam. His task was to interpret aerial photographs to decide where to drop bombs. He spent time in Cambodia during the first stirrings of genocide that flourished after the Americans left the region. The series of landscapes are infused with a red haze that fills the atmosphere, painted in this way to reflect this recent history, while the trees and architecture persist silently into another new age. The grounds-dwellers around the temples of Angkor Wat are without limbs more often than not as the community continues to be confronted by extensive UXO and slowly come to points of healing. The paintings of shrines found throughout the stone halls are a testament to the continued use of the temples as sacred spaces.

Painting of Ta Prohm temple in Angkor Wat, Cambodia by Lee Lee
Painting of Ta Prohm temple in Angkor Wat, Cambodia by Lee Lee
Painting of Ta Prohm temple in Angkor Wat, Cambodia by Lee Lee
Painting of Ta Prohm temple in Angkor Wat, Cambodia by Lee Lee
In the collection of Tracy Weil, Denver
Painting of Ta Prohm temple in Angkor Wat, Cambodia by Lee Lee
Painting of Ta Prohm temple in Angkor Wat, Cambodia by Lee Lee
Painting of Ta Prohm temple in Angkor Wat, Cambodia by Lee Lee
Painting of Ta Prohm temple in Angkor Wat, Cambodia by Lee Lee
Lee Lee | Ta Prohm series from Angkor Wat, Cambodia
Oil on canvas | 2005