Categories
.debris. Mobilities

2015 .debris. update

Since autumn 2012, .debris. has grown into a collaborative project which is being created as a response to the problems presented by single use plastic. The work reflects the literal problem of plastic in marine environments while offering a symbolic representation of the chemical body burdens carried by wildlife and humans alike. In presenting these issues, we are asked to consider misplaced notions of “disposability”, calling in to question consumer driven waste which has devalued what is in fact a very important material.

Surface Arts London invited the Debris Project to engage communities in northern Thailand during a residency specifically designed for collaborative works at the Rumpueng Community Arts Center during the month of August. The work was shown at the Rumpueng gallery in October, 2015. From there, the installation moved to an exhibit in downtown Chiang Mai by Art Relief International, who continued to develop the project regionally through the remainder of the year. The project traveled to Letterkenny Arts Center in Ireland as part of the Hybrid exchange between Colorado and Irish artists. The following spring the work was presented at TransCultural Exchange’s conference, Expanding Worlds at the University of Boston. A regional collaboration with multiple organizations through the San Francisco Bay Area culminated in an exhibition at the Gallery Route One near the National Seashore. The project was integrated into the summer camp program at the Marine Mammal Center and as an ongoing aspect of the ecological activism promoted by Save Our Shores in Santa Cruz. The integration of the project into regional educational programming took place through the school year with the culmination exhibition taking place with a presentation by Lee Lee at the Monterrey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Education Center in April 2016.

Highlights since the project was installed at the Chateau de la Napoule include an installation for the Mobile Art Exhibition curated by Aslak Aamot Kjaerulff, which was installed at the Aalborg University for the Cosmobilities Network in Copenhagen, Denmark. The project as presented in a mobilities context will be published by Springer Press International and released in 2016. A presentation on the value of stepping away of educational models when building international collaborations was given to the Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences for Welcome to the Anthropocene at Pace University, New York. Ties between chemical body burdens and industrial agriculture were explored on a Slow Food platform during Terra Madre in Turin, Italy. In the Caribbean, we executed a collaborative performance, Message in a Bottle with Aragorn’s workshop on Trellis Bay in the British Virgin Islands. Representations were also gathered from the Timouns Rezistanz in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti. Marine debris collected from a beach clean with Sharkastics on Maui have provided hard plastics softened by the open ocean to integrate into youth workshops on the mainland. Explorations on effective community engagement around plastic pollution were shared with the Voluntary Artist Studio of Thimphu, Bhutan. In conjunction with the Biennial of the Americas, Processus included part of the work in an exhibition about the Life of Things. Also in Colorado, the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History hosted a family activity day themed, From the Mountains through the Prairies to the Oceans, that tracked waterways. Installations of student involvement in the project were mounted in Denver by the Denver Aquarium, PlatteForum and the Ricks Center for Gifted Children at the University of Denver. In New Mexico, the river organization, Amigos Bravos, hosted a .debris. presentation at the Santa Fe Community Foundation as part of their Water Matters series, and the Field Institute of Taos integrated it as part of their curriculum to explore human impacts on river ecologies. The project has been published in articles by the United Nations Environment Programme, Bay Nature Magazine, RISDxyz and as an interview on Santa Fe Radio Café.
 
Essentially this was developed as a flexible tool to engage people creatively around issues surrounding plastic pollution. The overall project gained strength through gathering a wide range of geographical representations of the ecological impacts of plastic. It is used as a hands on activity to incorporate into existing programs or curricula, as well as a platform to share effective ways of addressing the problems at hand. 

Categories
.debris. Americas Industry Mobilities Rocky Mountain West War

Titan missile silo

The landscape conveyed in Crop covers a widespread smattering of Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Silos, the largest of which are the now defunct Titan missile silos. One Titan was built east of Denver. The federal government acquisition of farmland to build this massive structure that was put in operation for only a few years. Then they took away the bombs and gave the land back to the farmer. Dismayed, he dug out an access hole through which we would enter and explore this monument to destruction. It breaks my heart to think of the immense amount of resources that went into the construction of this under ground complex which now lay in ruin. In 2007 a group of artists convened in the blast tunnels to create and record music in the unique acoustics of the spaces. Their works were imbued with the energy of the space which made for haunting explorations of sound. Some of these were turned into a sound installation that I included in the curation of a duo of exhibitions on genocide for the Mizel Museum and as a site specific installation for the International Society of Genocide Scholars in Sarajevo, Bosnia. I brought with me a set of high powered spotlights and photographed the spaces. When I started creating work about the industrial food complex, these seemed a good fit because the chemicals that are used in industrial agriculture were actually born out of war. The fixed nitrogen developed in making bombs in the world wars was re-appropriated to make fertilizer after the wars’ end. It was fitting to add these to the overall series exploring the complexities in the way we grow and consume food today. Painted with acrylic on canvas when Thatcher Gray was very young. I had shifted to using acrylic to reduce fumes from oil paint while he was a baby. I’m not wild about the medium so it was not a lasting conversion.

Acrylic painting of a Titan missile silo by Lee Lee
Acrylic painting of a Titan missile silo by Lee Lee
Acrylic painting of a Titan missile silo by Lee Lee
Acrylic painting of a Titan missile silo by Lee Lee
Categories
Americas Women

Vrnda

Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee

When I was pregnant, I had the opportunity to listen to one of the impassioned speeches given by Vrnda Noel in Denver. Mother of a combat medic in Iraq, she shared deeply emotive stories of what was happening there based on letters written home by her son. She had made him promise to write about his experiences in minute detail. Ultimately this ended up being cathartic for him as there were many traumatic situations that he was able to let go, and then forget. The speech she was giving was during an anti-war rally outside our local senators’ offices and I was struck by the expressions of love, sorrow and fear that passed through her delicate features. After his return to the US, they created a number of participatory creative projects that spoke to the impacts of war and the process of healing the mental wounds from it. Empty army boots and civilian shoes installed in Civic Center Park represented the growing death toll on both sides of the conflict. The combat paper project helped Vets transform by encouraging them to purge frustrations by destroying uniforms, then use the pulp to create artworks. Their practices inspired some aspects of the community work I’ve developed over the years since.

This series of portraits was included in the very first exhibition I had after Thatcher Gray was born. I created them while he was in my womb, and the process allowed me to consider this relationship between a mother and her war torn son. Shreds of oil paintings that I had torn apart with a shotgun were used as the base of a collage, which I then laid hot coals atop to produce a speckling of charred board across the picture plain. Pencil drawings depict the range of expressions that passed through Vrnda as she spoke with determination about her love for her son, and as an extension, all of the other sons affected by war.

Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee
Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee
Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee