Categories
Americas Food Insects Mexico migrations Mobilities Rocky Mountain West

monarchs

Lee Lee - monoprint of monarch butterflies
monoprints | 2014
exhibited as an interactive installation with Susanna Mitchell in San Miguel d’Allende, Mexico for the Center for Global Justice, Moving Beyond Capitalism

exhibited in the Woodbine Ecology Center’s nature lab alongside dormant crop circles in the Midwest & a dispersal of milkweed seeds.
Lee Lee monoprint of monarch butterflies
Lee Lee acryllic painting of Midwestern Crop Circles
crop | acrylic on canvas | 2009
Categories
Americas Food Insects Rocky Mountain West

a year in grandpa’s garden – Taos

Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Radish - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Apple - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Waterfall - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Zucchini - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Calabash - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Calabash - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
tomato - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Yellow Squash - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Corn - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
3 sisters - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
cauliflower - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
broccoli - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
carrot - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
beets - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
kale - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
kale - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
winter squash - Garden Watercolor by Lee Lee, Haiku by Peter T Leonard
Categories
Americas Food Guatemala Mobilities Women

Chichicastenango

With eleven month old Thatcher Gray on my back, we meander our way though Chichicastenango’s Saturday market, awash in vibrant Mayan color and patterning. Starting with stone lithograph prints of rain forest inspired drawings, tracked with fresh tar then torn into squares, the process represents the fragmentation of Mayan land and culture. Atop this foundation, cultural persistence is demonstrated by Mayan traditional practices maintained despite Guatemala’s history of atrocity.

Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Mixed media artwork from Guatemala by Lee Lee
Lee Lee | Chichicastenango Market, Guatemala 2009
Mixed media including tar, sharpie, colored pencil, watercolor and gouache on torn stone lithograph
14″ x 14″ | 2010 Taos
Categories
Americas Women

Vrnda

Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee

When I was pregnant, I had the opportunity to listen to one of the impassioned speeches given by Vrnda Noel in Denver. Mother of a combat medic in Iraq, she shared deeply emotive stories of what was happening there based on letters written home by her son. She had made him promise to write about his experiences in minute detail. Ultimately this ended up being cathartic for him as there were many traumatic situations that he was able to let go, and then forget. The speech she was giving was during an anti-war rally outside our local senators’ offices and I was struck by the expressions of love, sorrow and fear that passed through her delicate features. After his return to the US, they created a number of participatory creative projects that spoke to the impacts of war and the process of healing the mental wounds from it. Empty army boots and civilian shoes installed in Civic Center Park represented the growing death toll on both sides of the conflict. The combat paper project helped Vets transform by encouraging them to purge frustrations by destroying uniforms, then use the pulp to create artworks. Their practices inspired some aspects of the community work I’ve developed over the years since.

This series of portraits was included in the very first exhibition I had after Thatcher Gray was born. I created them while he was in my womb, and the process allowed me to consider this relationship between a mother and her war torn son. Shreds of oil paintings that I had torn apart with a shotgun were used as the base of a collage, which I then laid hot coals atop to produce a speckling of charred board across the picture plain. Pencil drawings depict the range of expressions that passed through Vrnda as she spoke with determination about her love for her son, and as an extension, all of the other sons affected by war.

Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee
Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee
Iraq war mom - mixed media drawing by Lee Lee
Categories
Americas

Carolina lintheads

My great grandmother was a spinner in South Carolina for most of her life. She took me there before she died, and I recorded the burnt out and collapsed structures as a perfect reflection of how manufacturing has continued to leave our borders over the years. The elegant brick structures have been abandoned for cheap labor and lower environmental standards found elsewhere in the world.

Offering an intimate portrayal of life in a ‘mill village’, where inhabitants were often referred to as ‘lintheads’, I appropriated excerpts from my grandmother’s letters into burnt drawings of the mill. They reflect the difficulties of life during the industrial era and remind us that we are not so different from people elsewhere.

oil painting on burlap of abandoned cotton mill by Lee Lee
oil painting on burlap of abandoned cotton mill by Lee Lee
oil painting on burlap of abandoned cotton mill by Lee Lee
oil painting on burlap of abandoned cotton mill by Lee Lee
Lee Lee | lintheads
oil on burlap
36″ x 28″ | 2007
“Other school mates called them Niggers because they were part Indian and so very dark.My Mother never told me this.I think this is one reason,she let other people intimidate her,all through Life.Plus her Perents kept her out of School until her younger Sister was old enough to go.That way they could walk together. The had Primmer(same as Kinder Garten)when she got into the First grade,she was 8 yrs.old. She made straight A’s,all the way through the 8th grade,then her Family took her out of School to go to work in the Mill to help support the Family This has always bothered her.I told her than should not bother her.She had 3 Sons that got her smarts and their Daddy’s stong Back,they were not afraid of work.One with out the other does not function very well.”
“Sene and Lum’s eldest Child was named Roy.He worked in a Textile Plant all of his life,had 3 Daughters and was the first to die.Lois was the 2nd.child…Milton was next,Textile,also.After retirement,became a Deputy Sheriff.The Story is that you should never put a Gun and Holster on some People.It changes their entire Personality.He had 2 Sons,the Dr.dropped the Instuments on the firs Baby’s Head and killed it.The next Son lived to be 16 and died with Cancer.We were not familiar with Cancer back then.”
“Mema is the last of her 9 Brothers and Sisters. None of them lived to be her age,neither Perents. She was always sickly,never walking until she was 3.The sister that she was the closest was Kathleen.They played together,constantly …They lived in a House on the Mill Village that was built on very high Brick Pillars You could walk around under it.They would build a play house by drawing off the rooms with a stick in the dirt.They filled each room with broken dishes,vases,back then there were not many things being thrown away.They piled up wood for their stove.An older Brother (Milton)told Mema to go ask Granny for a match to light their stove. Granny came under the HOuse and gave Milton a sound thrashing,he knew better,Mema and Kathleen were too young.”
“Lum could not read and write.He boarded a School Teacher in exchange for teaching him.The Teacher was amazed with his ability to work with numbers.When Lum retired from the Mill,He was Asst.Superintendant of the Mill.A very well liked Man.He suffered so much from Asthma and died when he was my age.”
“Lum and Sene,always lived on the Mill Village.He was born in Pelzer (in Piedmont Sene),which is a Mill Town 16 miles from here.His Mother and Father died when he was very young.An older Brother reared him.He went to work in the Mill when he was 9 yrs.old.Long before child labor laws.Lum bought the Farm where I was born and my Daddy Cecil was a Share Cropper.I remember when I was a Child, Lum would come every Sunday,he and my Daddy would walk over the Fields and discuss things

Quotes from letters written by my grandmother, Bonnie Jean Cromer
In the collection of Eron Johnson, Denver
Lee Lee | lintheads | 11″ x 11″ | May 2007
Xerograph, charcoal, pencil and tar paper collaged with burnt Strathmore paper
Categories
Americas Food

Kalihi

Time spent in Honolulu in the first years of the new millennium was split between our home, way up in the top of the valley above Palolo, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, where I studied stone lithography with James Koga, and the studio, perched above a woodshop that built Ukeleles in the industrial zone of Kalihi. This was an area where I needed to be accompanied by a local as it was rare to see a white face there. It was in Kalihi that I found and painted these fish markets. The street scenes reflected in shop windows were painted in Chinatown, from photographs I had taken on family dim sum Sundays.

Fish market in Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
Crab tanks | Private collection, Mexico
Fish market in Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
On view at the Taos Distillery
Fish market in Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
Red Snapper | Private collection, Providence RI
Chinatown Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
Chinatown Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee
Chinatown Honolulu - oil painting by Lee Lee